Record Two: Night and Day

Record Two: Night and Day

Allthing Publications

Allthing Publications

We think we know a person. We think we know how the world works. We think we know our towns, neighbours, and homes. And we do. But.Then the air changes. Then the lights go out. And suddenly, we’re not sure what to think.We think we know a person. We think we know how the world works. We think we know our towns, neighbours, and homes. And we do. But.Then the air changes. Then the lights go out. And suddenly, we’re not sure what to think.Record Two, the second anthology in the Record series, is meant to document little stories from little people. This issue explores what happens when the lights go out—the difference between what we know and what’s out there. What we see, and what we get. What we want, and what we do. Sometimes, the difference is small. But other times, it’s night and day.
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Record One: Peep Show

Record One: Peep Show

Allthing Publications

Allthing Publications

Shakespeare said that all the world's a stage. We think it's more like a peep show. Stuff happens, but a lot of it is too small, too quiet, or too odd to get on a playbill.Record One contains nine stories of nine people's lives in 2013. The writers didn't make headlines, climb mountains, or even pay their rent on time, but they were here, and that has to count for something.Shakespeare said that all the world's a stage. We think it's more like a peep show. Stuff happens, but a lot of it is too small, too quiet, or too odd to get on a playbill.Record One contains nine stories of nine people's lives in 2013. For these nine people, a lot has happened in the short time they’ve been alive. The Berlin Wall fell. Hip-hop became a thing. Twitter happened. Protestors in Tahrir Square threw down an autocrat. There was a civil war in Libya. The iPhone 5 came out.We saw a lot of big stories. If you want big stories, you don’t need to look here. You can turn on the news and see drone strikes in Pakistan, nuclear threats from North Korea, and a garbage island the size of Texas churning in the Pacific. Heck, I heard the guy with no legs who climbed Mount Killimanjaro has a book out. If big lives and big stories are your thing, you can go read that book; it’s probably great.Or maybe, you’d like to hear some little stories.Amid the big news, big things, and big people that happened in the past few years, there was a lot of other stuff going on. Some of it was bad. Parents got divorced. Relationships didn’t work out. Our beards never grew in. But there was good stuff too: we remembered our loved ones after they left. We got enough sleep. We quit smoking.That’s what this collection is for. Little stories, little people, and little things. We didn’t necessarily make headlines, climb mountains, or even pay our rent on time, but we were here, and I think that counts for something.
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Record Three: Shame

Record Three: Shame

Allthing Publications

Allthing Publications

I’ve done bad things. I’ve lied. I’ve cheated. Whenever my family gets doughnuts, I hide the blueberry fritter so no one else can eat it. This issue of Record is all about shame, and the stories we'd rather not tell.I’ve done bad things.I’ve lied. I’ve cheated. Whenever my family gets doughnuts, I hide the blueberry fritter so no one else can eat it.And yet, it’s not me who does those things, not really. It’s another guy, another me that I push to the side of my head. I’m a nice guy. How could I do bad stuff?In this issue, we wrote about events we’re not proud of. It wasn’t easy. Dredging up those dark, wriggling bits of ourselves, throwing them into the light, taking careful pictures to record for posterity, we learned some uncomfortable truths about who we are.What we are, is stories. Some of which we’d rather not tell. It’s not easy to come to terms with the shameful parts, to admit that the same guy who gives money to the homeless guy by the subway is the same guy who undresses women in bars. But, on a positive note, I believe that by writing through them, by admitting our faults, we merge the shameful stories with the narrative of our life, and I think that makes us a bit more whole.
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