Rollo at Work

Rollo at Work

Jacob Abbott

Children's Books / History / Biographies & Memoirs

The Shelf2Life Children?s Literature and Fiction Collection is a charming set of pre-1923 nursery rhymes, fairy tales, classic novels and short stories for children and young adults. From a tardy white rabbit, spirited orphan and loyal watchdog to a dreamer named Dorothy, this collection presents an assortment of memorable characters whose stories light up the pages. The young and young at heart will delight in magical tales of fairies and angels and be captivated by explorations of mysterious islands. The Shelf2Life Children?s Literature and Fiction Collection allows you to open a door into a world of fantasy and make-believe where imaginations can run wild.
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Rollo in London

Rollo in London

Jacob Abbott

Children's Books / History / Biographies & Memoirs

The fourteen Rollo Books starting with Learning to Talk and ending with the 1842 Rollo Philosophy Part IV-The Sky were the earliest multi volume children\'s series involving stories of a central character. These moralistic little tales were printed by numerous publishing houses into the twentieth century. Although this series of Rollo books was not as popular as the Rollo\'s Tour in Europe Series, it still was a massive success. I.--CITY AND TOWN, 13 II.--LONDON BRIDGE, 20 III.-THE RIVER, 45 IV.--THE POLICEMAN, 55 V.--LODGINGS, 66 VI.--BREAKFAST, 74 VII.--WESTMINSTER ABBEY, 80 VIII.--CALCULATIONS, 98 IX.--ST. PAUL\'S, 107 X.--THE DOME OF ST. PAUL\'S, 126 XI.--THE ARISTOCRACY, 142 XII.--A MISFORTUNE, 159 XIII.--PHILOSOPHY, 164 XIV.--THE DOCKS, 173 XV.--THE EMIGRANTS, 191 XVI.--THE TUNNEL AND THE TOWER, 214
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Rollo in Rome

Rollo in Rome

Jacob Abbott

Children's Books / History / Biographies & Memoirs

Follow Rollo, and his friends, on their many adventures. You will have fun learning about subjects such as ethics, history, science, friendship and family. He will take you on adventures around the block, and around the globe!Follow Rollo, and his friends, on their many adventures. You will have fun learning about subjects such as ethics, history, science, friendship and family. He will take you on adventures around the block, and around the globe!
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Rollo at Play; Or, Safe Amusements

Rollo at Play; Or, Safe Amusements

Jacob Abbott

Children's Books / History / Biographies & Memoirs

One pleasant morning in the autumn, when Rollo was about five years old, he was sitting on the platform, behind his father\'s house, playing. He had a hammer and nails, and some small pieces of board. He was trying to make a box. He hammered and hammered, and presently he dropped his work down and said, fretfully, "O dear me!" "What is the matter, Rollo?" said Jonas,—for it happened that Jonas was going by just then, with a wheelbarrow. "I wish these little boards would not split so. I cannot make my box." "You drive the nails wrong; you put the wedge sides with the grain." "The wedge sides!" said Rollo; "what are the wedge sides,—and the grain? I do not know what you mean." But Jonas went on, trundling his wheelbarrow; though he looked round and told Rollo that he could not stop to explain it to him then. Rollo was discouraged about his box. He thought he would look and see what Jonas was going to do. Jonas trundled the wheelbarrow along, until he came opposite the barn-door, and there he put it down. He went into the barn, and presently came out with an axe. Then he took the sides of the wheelbarrow off, and placed them up against the barn.
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Jonas on a Farm in Winter

Jonas on a Farm in Winter

Jacob Abbott

Children's Books / History / Biographies & Memoirs

"The Prince of Writers for the Young" "This little work, with its companion, Jonas On A Farm In Summer, is intended as the continuation of a series, the first two volumes of which, Jonas\'s Stories and Jonas A Judge, have already been published. They are all designed, not merely to interest and amuse the juvenile reader, but to give him instruction, by exemplifying the principles of honest integrity, and plain practical good sense, in their application to the ordinary circumstances of childhood." -Jacob Abbott About an hour after breakfast, Jonas with the oxen, and Oliver and Josey with the horse, were slowly moving along up the road which led back from the pond towards the wood lot. The wood lot was a portion of the forest, which had been reserved, to furnish a supply of wood for the winter fires. The road followed for some distance the bank of the brook, which emptied into the pond at the place where Jonas and Oliver had cleared land, when Jonas first came to live on this farm. It was a very pleasant road. The brook was visible here and there through the bushes and trees on one side of it. These bushes and trees were of course bare of leaves, excepting the evergreens, and they were loaded down with the snow. Some were bent over so that the tops nearly touched the ground. The brook itself, too, was almost buried and concealed in the snow. In the still places, it had frozen over; and so the snow had been supported by the ice, and thus it concealed both ice and water. At the little cascades and waterfalls, however, which occurred here and there, the water had not frozen. Water does not freeze easily where it runs with great velocity. At these places, therefore, the boys could see the water, and hear it bubbling and gurgling as it fell, and disappeared under the ice which had formed below. At last, they came to the wood lot. The wood which they were going to haul had been cut before, and it had been piled up in long piles, extending here and there under the trees which had been left. These piles were now, however, partly covered with the snow, which lay light and unsullied all over the surface of the ground. The sticks of wood in these piles were of different sizes, though they were all of the same length. Some had been cut from the tops of the trees, or from the branches, and were, consequently, small in diameter; others were from the trunks, which would, of course, make large logs. These logs had, however, been split into quarters by a beetle and wedges, when the wood had been prepared, so that there were very few sticks or logs so large, but that Jonas could pretty easily get them on to the sled.
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