Wild Duck revisited

Wild Duck revisited

John Fajo

John Fajo

It all starts with an old friend, Gregers, returning home after a long journey. His arrival leads to unprecedented turmoil as the main character, Hjalmar, has to decide what to make of his life. This is not easy as things have changed a lot in the north since the age of Ibsen... In fact, everything has changed.AbstractIbsen’s classic Wild Duck is the epitome of Scandinavian literature with a feministic point of view. In fact, if we look at Ibsen’s other works, like a Doll’s House we see things from a woman’s perspective, in other words we only get one side of the story. This is typical of Norwegian literature.The current work attempts to remedy this, or better put give insight into the possible feelings of a man, with all the positive and negative aspects. In Wild Duck, Hjalmar Ekdal plays the role of a dull and rather repugnant character, who can only think of selfish goals and comfort. According to society he is more or less a male chauvinist, a bad guy for rebelling against and being bothered by things that should simply be accepted or not questioned at all.Wild Duck revisited looks at the situation from a modern point of view taking into account of the emancipation of women that had taken place over the past hundred years. The main characters are the same, the storyline loosely follows the classic, but deviates more and more as it advances. Hjalmar is the main character, we see things from his perspective, the singular third person is reserved for him. The book is divided into five parts, the structure and style develops from classical continuous to intermittent modern. The wild duck symbol is present, but some others are included as well, most notably the lion that eats grass and the Viking legend. Conversations and events not from the classical masterpiece have been adopted from real life cases.Wild duck revisited criticises modern western society and lifestyle for being unable to fulfil the most rudimental of all human needs, the need for love. It also tries to determine how much someone’s identity can be twisted, the limits that nature (genes etc.) impose on the individual.John Fajo, 2003
Read online
  • 475
Software Evolution

Software Evolution

John Fajo

John Fajo

Arriving in the big city one may find oneself lost, especially if one is to come across an elusive man like the baron, who never reveals himself. Yet there is no escape from destiny as the events unfold, and the protagonists confront each other for multiple showdowns that are to change their lives and the course of history.John FajoSoftware EvolutionAbstractAs the title indicates this is a book about software evolution. Software evolution has two meanings and consequently the novel has two continuous parallel themes, one is thriller-like and its main purpose is to give a supportive framework for the other, which is about development in the thinking manner of a person at childhood’s end, this being called software evolution. Besides these, the book attempts to pinpoint the misconceptions people have about the main essence of science, any science for that matter. Here the second meaning of software evolution emerges.The book is organized into four parts and follows the classical scheme: introduction, main theme, interlude and conclusion. The events are depicted more as slides or short footages, the time elapsing in-between is irrelevant, and time hasn’t the usual meaning due to the second theme; it’s linear from the characters’ point of view, but has non-linear aspects otherwise.In ‘The inspector’, we have a build up to the main theme. The protagonist, the inspector arrives in a big city, where he is faced with a different world, his ideas are challenged.In ‘The scientist’, the main theme unfolds. We step into the world of a scientist, not a joyful inventor or a forgetful genius, but an emotionless and well-organized person on an island secluded from the rest of the world. Most of the events are presented from another character’s point of view, which allows perspective to be obtained. It is also vital for the second theme, for this other, nameless person is the one the scientist talks to, presents his ideas, fears, love and hate.In ‘In deserted nowhere’ our nameless character is banned, has to travel to a far away planet. He is entirely alone, only a dream world helps him survive his solitude. Romanticism is defended; romanticism the scientist criticized in ‘The scientist’. This part also allows the thriller theme to continue several years later than it had ended, without any abrupt jumps.In ‘The beggar’, we have the conclusion, childhood’s end. The two main characters confront each other for the last time.John Fajo, 1996
Read online
  • 265