High Plains Justice

High Plains Justice

Maryk Lewis

Maryk Lewis

When outlaws stole a thousand Texas longhorns, the rustlers' main problem was what to do with the slow-moving cattle. Johnnie Bell’s problem lay in getting them back. The army couldn’t help — they had marauding Cheyenne to deal with. Texas Rangers had no jurisdiction once the cattle were over the border. Fortunately Johnnie had the help of Comanche friends, and a certain feisty widow woman.Hot lead flew, and blood flowed freely in 1859. The Cheyenne were raiding. When outlaws gunned down two sleepy cowpokes, and rode off with a thousand Texas longhorns, their main problem was what to do with the slow-moving cattle. Johnnie Bell’s problem lay in getting them back. The army couldn’t help — they had the marauding Indians to deal with. Texas Rangers had no jurisdiction once the cattle were over the border, and other settlers had their own homes and herds to guard. Luckily for Johnnie, he had two Comanche friends with points to prove, and along the way he met up with a feisty widow woman, who had lost both husband and herd to the self-same rustlers.
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By Fickle Winds Blown

By Fickle Winds Blown

Maryk Lewis

Maryk Lewis

With no dowry, for Jessica Gordon there was little prospect of eventual marriage in 1870’s Ireland. Her sister Sarah, who was already sixteen, had no dowry either. An arranged marriage with a settler in the colonies was the best that could be done for her. The two girls were to sail half-way around the world so Sarah could marry a man she had never met.For twelve-year-old, nearly thirteen, Jessica Gordon there was little prospect of eventual marriage in 1870’s Ireland. Being the sixth daughter in a large family, there was no money for a dowry, and without that no young man in her class could afford her. The fourth daughter, Sarah, was already sixteen years old, and there was no dowry for her either. An arranged marriage with a settler in the colonies was the best that could be done for her. She was to sail half-way around the world to marry a man she had never met. When Sarah offered to swap her cabin-class ticket for two in steerage, and take her younger sister with her, Jess accepted gladly. The shortage of women in the colonies would offer her the best prospects she could hope for. As they boarded the sailing ship Haldia in the London Docks, Jess little expected what the sisters found aboard that crowded emigrant ship. The friendship and rough humour of both passengers and crew saw them through nearly four months of being buffeted about by every wind that blew.
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