The Second Fly Caster: Fatherhood, Recovery and an Unforgettable Tournament

The Second Fly Caster: Fatherhood, Recovery and an Unforgettable Tournament

Randy Kadish

Outdoors & Nature / Spirituality / Sports

Erik is proud that his father is a great fly caster, but then an unexpected outcome of a casting tournament leaves Erik questioning what once seemed to be only a sport.Years later, these questions deepen when Erik’s ideals are crushed by war. He struggles with his demons, until a discovery leads him to new meanings of fly casting. Through their prism, Erik sees the world in a forgiving light.From The Second Fly Caster:When I was a boy I thought my father was the greatest fly caster on earth, so I grew up dreaming of following in his way and not of becoming, as my mother wanted, an accountant.Today, I am a man who often relives the important events in my life, but when I think back to the five state casting tournaments my father won, most of their images and sounds have melted and flowed into downstream memories, except for the images and sounds of one special tournament. Instead of fading over time, they ripened in my mind in more than just a visual way, and now they are almost as vivid as the moments of today. …e-Story Description: Erik, a young boy, is proud that his father, the winner of several state championships, is probably the greatest long distance fly caster on earth. But then a threatening prelude and an unexpected outcome of a casting tournament leave Erik reeling with unanswered questions about what once seemed to be only a sport.These questions linger and then, years later, deepen when Erik’s idealistic plans and actions are crushed when he experiences combat in the Vietnam War. He struggles, unsuccessfully, with his demons, until a seemingly accidental discovery lead him back to the ways and new meanings of fly casting. Through their prism Erik learns to see himself and the world in a forgiving light.
Read online
  • 591
The Bad, The Good and Two Fly Fishing Women, and a Life-Changing Day on a River

The Bad, The Good and Two Fly Fishing Women, and a Life-Changing Day on a River

Randy Kadish

Outdoors & Nature / Spirituality / Sports

When Amanda's mother deserts her to be with a new man, Amanda is hurt. She loses faith in the world, especially when her loving grandmother is diagnosed with cancer.Amanda struggles to find answers, and then on the banks of the Junction River she, along with Shana, her adopted dog, and Vernon, a grieving alcoholic, experience an unexpected, terrifying event that helps her learn to forgive.From The Good and Two Fly Fishing Women:Now, as I approach the autumn of my life and some, though not all, of my dreams have come true, how do I describe myself? As a wife and a mother who loves her family, as an attorney who admires the law, and as a fly fisher who proudly says she learned from the greatest fly fisher she ever knew: her grandmother.And whether by accident or not, my grandmother, with the help of some unexpected and dark events, taught me something even more important than fishing, something that, even after such a long, long parade of days, I still cherish, like an antique fly rod, and wish to pass on.The lesson happened in the middle of trout season, on the first day of summer, when several incidents came together, perhaps randomly, and formed the big event of June twenty-first. I was fourteen years old and very, very hurt and angry.Why, you ask? ...e-Story Description:When her mother deserts her to be with a new man, Amanda is hurt and betrayed. She loses faith in the world. To soothe her pain, she retreats into fly fishing, until she learns that her loving grandmother has terminal cancer.Amanda struggles to find answers. Then one day she discovers that her grandmother, against the doctor’s orders, has gone fishing somewhere on the Junction River. Frightened, Amanda, along with Shana, her adopted dog, and Vernon, a grieving alcoholic, searches the river—but marches into an unexpected, terrifying event that, in a surprising way, helps her learn to forgive and to see the good in the world."Kadish has carved a wonderful story full of antics that any true angler would love. His characters are fun and bold, mercurial and fast somewhat like the fish themselves. ... If you love fishing and especially fly fishing, you will enjoy this wholesome family story. It takes you back to a time before innocence is changed and the times where a child is still unafraid to speak their mind." --Seattle Post Intelligencer Online
Read online
  • 502
The Fly Caster Who Tried To Make Peace With the World

The Fly Caster Who Tried To Make Peace With the World

Randy Kadish

Outdoors & Nature / Spirituality / Sports

Making peace with the world, sooner or later most of us have to. But how? Ian Mac Bride's way begins in 1909 when he watches a fly-casting tournament and dreams of becoming a great fly caster. But soon Ian experiences personal tragedy, and then is appalled by the slaughter of World War I. Torn by grief, Ian loses faith in the world - until, almost by accident, he finds a way to come to terms.Making peace with the world, sooner or later most of us have to. But how? For Ian Mac Bride, his way begins almost accidentally when, in 1909, he watches a fly-casting tournament in New York's Central Park, and begins to dream of becoming a great fly caster. But soon Ian experiences personal tragedy, and then is appalled by the unexpected slaughter of World War I. He retreats into the world of fly fishing and fly casting, and meets unforgettable anglers like: Doc, a Civil War veteran, who tells how, after he enlisted in return for drinking money, he was unexpectedly changed by the horror of war; Izzy, a mysterious immigrant, who, in his way, teaches Ian perhaps the most important lesson of long-distance, fly casting; and George M. L. La Branche who, though torn by self-doubt, writes the book that revolutionizes fly fishing. And so, these anglers help change Ian's hopes and values. Though his father questions his courage, Ian decides to become a teacher instead of a lawyer, and moves near the beautiful Beaverkill River, the birthplace of fly fishing in America. But tragedy still follows him. Torn by grief, he curses the world and loses faith in it until, almost by accident, he finds a way to come to terms. How? The answer will surprise you. "A maverick and memorable book." - Nick Lyons, author Spring Creel“I simply enjoyed the heck out of it." - Eric Peper, coauthor, Fly Fishing The Beaverkill "An unforgettable cast of characters." - Jim Witty, Bend Bulletin"The novel is well-written, I thoroughly enjoyed reading it and highly recommend it whether you're a fly fisher or not." - John Pitarresi, Utica Observer-Dispatch “An engaging tale of a young man coming of age." - Lee Murdock, Fly Fish Magazine."A compelling novel that describes one fly caster's search for personal peace." - Bill AuCoin, the Aucoin Report “Great book Mr. Kadish!” - Bill Anderson, Trout Waders.
Read online
  • 386