Douglas the Dragon Play

Douglas the Dragon Play

William Forde

Psychology / Music

‘Douglas the Dragon’ symbolises The Power of Love that lives in each of us, representing the constant struggle between the forces of good and evil in the behaviour we display.The story is set in a time and place where war is waged between the human emotions of Fear, Anger and Love. The prize at stake is the greatest prize of all: control over the heart, mind and actions of every human being.The author’s works have been praised by numerous celebrities; the most notable being Nelson Mandela who described his African stories as ‘Wonderful’, the late Princess Diana who used to read the Douglas Dragon stories to the Princes William and Harry when they were aged 9 and 7 years, and a former Chief Inspector of Schools for Ofsted, who described the author’s writing to the press as being ‘High quality literature.’As the founder of Anger Management in Great Britain during the early 70s, William Forde freely gave his anger management knowledge to the world and within a matter of a few years; ‘Anger Management’ groups mushroomed across the English speaking world. After founding the process of Anger Management, William Forde spent 25 years researching his work with both offenders and non-offenders, with aggressive and non-assertive response pattern types and with adults and young people who displayed ‘involuntary response patterns’ of excessive ‘anger’ or ‘fear’. For 25 years, William Forde worked as a Probation Officer with The West Yorkshire Probation Service, during which time he operated his ‘Anger Management’ programmes in Probation Offices, Hostels, Hospitals, Prisons, Educational Establishments and Community Halls. His work in this area brought high success and national acclaim in his area of specialism.By the time he retired as a Probation Office he had established a growing interest of working with children who displayed problems with Anger Management, along with difficulty in processing and expressing other emotionally disturbing emotions such as bereavement, loss, jealousy, bullying, and an inability to possess positive self-regard and love, etc. etc.He became an author in 1989 and initially wrote books for young children that focused upon themes which involved dealing with the type of emotions his 25 years' experience as a Probation Officer had identified as creating emotional disturbance and inappropriate behavioural responses when not processed or healthily expressed. In short, he was using the medium of 'story telling' to openly and covertly acquaint his readership with ‘Anger Management’ principles and appropriate behavioural change.From the many books that he has written for child, young person and adult, his most popular has been the Douglas the Dragon stories, which have been published and republished many times since 1990 and which the next King of England had read to him as a young boy by his mother.Douglas the Dragon symbolises ‘The Power of Love’, which exists in all of us. There lives within the heart of every man, woman and child, two dragons: one is a ‘Dragon of Love’ and the other is a ‘Dragon of Anger’. Both dragons find it impossible to co-exist within the same heart and they are therefore in constant battle to be sole occupant and to control the thoughts, feelings and actions of the body they inhabit. If you want the ‘Dragon of Love’ to occupy your heart, you must evict the ‘Dragon of Anger’ from it. Only by putting ‘Anger’ out can one put ‘Love’ in! This previous sentence essentially represents the totality of 60+ years' learning for me! William Forde January 2012. The five songs that accompany this musical play and their backing tracks can be freely downloaded from www.fordefables.co.uk/audio-downloads.
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Sleezy the Fox: Story One - Sleezy Gets a Second Chance

Sleezy the Fox: Story One - Sleezy Gets a Second Chance

William Forde

Psychology / Music

Each of us shall experience or perpetrate some wrong in our lives. At the critical stage of reconciliation and healing, it is vitally important that we are able to give others and ourselves the benefit of a ‘second chance’. And if you are like I used to be growing up, you may need to receive a ‘second chance’ many times before you eventually get it right.As a growing child, the one thing that I experienced in abundance was ‘second chances.’ In fact, I’d go as far as to say that without having had my fair share of second chances, my life would have taken a much different course. Second chances were my life saver!Not surprisingly, one of my favourite books was Victor Hugo’s ‘Les Misērables,’ a story that was chiefly responsible for transforming me from ‘Thief’ to that of ‘Probation Officer’ in later life. I was also fascinated by the bible story of Christ telling His followers to ‘turn the other cheek’ in circumstances where it seemed more natural to ‘strike back.’ I eventually came to understand that the instruction of Christ to turn the other cheek wasn’t so that the offender might strike you once more, but to afford him/her ‘a second chance’ not to strike you again.Wherever the fault lies, whatever the character trait requiring changing happens to be or however the behaviour needs improvement, being provided with ‘a second chance’ is essential to one’s overall sense of well being. It may be that losing weight is what is required to getting a second chance at life or giving up smoking or abstaining from alcohol or drugs. One may need to address one’s inappropriate behaviour of aggression, distrust, bullying, dishonesty, name calling or anything which adversely affects one’s life and image. Whatever the unhappy state of being, ‘a second chance’ may be what one requires to either give or receive.‘Sleezy the Fox’ is a book of four stories about the overarching theme of ‘second chances’. On the surface it deals with the immigration of a married couple and their seven children into a strange country, the bullying of neighbours, the ostracizing of offenders from the community as a whole and the alienation that often exists between man and wild beast and beast and wild man!Each of us shall experience or perpetrate some wrong in our lives. At the critical stage of reconciliation and healing, it is vitally important that we are able to give others and ourselves the benefit of a ‘second chance’. And if you are like I used to be growing up, you may need to receive a ‘second chance’ many times before you eventually get it right.
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Lost Lucy

Lost Lucy

William Forde

Psychology / Music

‘Lost Lucy’ is a story for the 4 to 7 year old that tells about a careless girl who is very forgetful. She forgets to do things which are dangerous. She forgets to do things which are unhygienic. She forgets to do things which are inconsiderate. She forgets to do things which are rude and impolite. One day she gets lost and forgets her name and address. Stranger danger issue also dealt with.‘Lost Lucy’ is a story for the 4 to 7 year old child that tells about a careless girl who is very forgetful. She forgets to do things which are dangerous. She forgets to do things which are unhygienic. She forgets to do things which are inconsiderate. She forgets to do things which are rude and impolite.One day when Lucy arrives home from school, she takes her dog Patch for a walk. While walking, she starts daydreaming and finishes up lost. Then she finds a police station goes in and discovers that she has also forgotten her address and her name.Read about how Lucy finds her name and where she lives again with the help of a gentle policeman. Also read about some of the important things that one should do and not do, if ever one gets lost. The story raises some of the issues concerning ‘Stranger Danger,’ along with other helpful tips.This story was transmitted by the Bradford Radio for Schools on four or five occasions during 2000 and 2005.William Forde
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Action Annie: Story One - Annie's Christmas Surprise

Action Annie: Story One - Annie's Christmas Surprise

William Forde

Psychology / Music

The story addresses that perennial question that has perplexed the minds of millions of children ever since ‘Father Christmas’ came into their lives. “If there's a Father Christmas, and he visits the home of every boy and girl across the world to give them a present; then why does he always give the most expensive presents to the richest children and the cheapest presents to the poorest?”In dealing with the theme of this first story in the ‘Action Annie’ series of stories from the book of the same name, I wanted to address that perennial question that has perplexed the minds of millions of children ever since ‘Father Christmas’ became a prime feature of their Christmas Day celebrations. “If there is a Father Christmas, and he is a Christmas visitto the home of every boy and girl across the world to give them a present; then why does he always give the most expensive presents to those children whose parents are the richest and the cheapest presents to those children whose parents are the poorest?”Another reason for writing the ‘Action Annie’ stories was to correct an imbalance which had appeared to have developed between girls and boys; and in particular, the differing stereotypes. When one looked at ‘roles’ and ‘the type of behaviour’ that might be ‘expected’ from a boy, but which was wholly ‘never expected’ or considered ‘acceptable’ from a girl; the discrimination practised was more subtle: such as shouting, swearing, fighting, picking one’s nose and even making rude noises in public! In short; ‘Action Annie’ represented ‘girl power’ in action and was my humble attempt of redressing the perceptual balance.Annie is an imaginative and very active seven-year-old whose mind and body is always on the move. She never seems to stop. Even as she sleeps, she is dreaming about the things she plans to do tomorrow. Annie is always thinking up new ideas and inventing things. Once she gets an idea inside her head, she becomes determined to try it out. If her ideas don't work out the first time Annie tries them out, she will try and try again. Once Annie has decided to do something, nobody and nothing will stop her.Annie's head is crammed with ideas and her body is filled with feelings, feelings which she finds impossible to hide from the outside world. Anyone can tell whether Annie is feeling happy or sad by simply looking at her and by listening to what she says, because she just can’t hide her feelings.When Annie is happy, her smiley face tells you so and when she is sad, the smile on her face will quickly disappear and be replaced by a squashed-tomato look. When Annie is ‘very happy', the smile on her face widens, her two arms begin to rotate like the propellers of an aircraft, her two feet jump her body up into the air and her mouth gleefully yells out, "Yippee! Yippee! Yippee! Yippee for Annie!"*When Annie gets angry she knows how to get the anger out of her. When Annie wants to get the anger out of her body, she writes it out, she talks it out and she acts it out. If she is angry with someone, she may write them a nasty letter and then tear it up without posting it. When she does this, she finds that expressing her feelings makes her feel a bit better. Whenever Annie becomes annoyed with another person she goes into a corner where she won’t be heard and calls the person a ‘Jolly old stinker!’ If she is very angry, she will go to her bedroom and pretend that the other person is her pillow. Then she will have a pillow fight, expressing her angry feelings to the pillow she is punching. Or she may lie on her back on the bed and peddle her legs up in the air furiously until she is physically exhausted and all the anger has left her body.*The author of these stories ‘founded’ Anger Management Programmes in Great Britain in 1971 and freely gave them to the world. Within a few years, they had mushroomed across the English- speaking world and have helped millions of people since. Included within the asterisked paragraph above are some ‘easy to understand’ and ‘simple to follow’ instructions for helping to manage anger in a young child. There is a little bit of Annie in every girl and boy. That is what makes her so likable. Are you like Annie in any of her ways?
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Douglas the Dragon: Book 1 - Douglas the Unloved Dragon

Douglas the Dragon: Book 1 - Douglas the Unloved Dragon

William Forde

Psychology / Music

Douglas the Dragon symbolises ‘the power of love.’ A young orphaned dragon is found and adopted by a young boy and becomes a much-loved dragon in the village. When the boy is killed by a volcano, the dragon is eventually evicted from the community. The dragon spends 50 years in exile sitting upon his volcano of hate, getting angrier and angrier until his anger explodes and he seeks revengeBy 1971, I had founded the process upon which all ‘Anger Management’ groups would thereafter follow and freely gave this knowledge to the world. Within the space of two years, ‘Anger Management’ (a phrase that I coined), had mushroomed across the English speaking world. After 25 years of researching and specialising in Anger Management, Relaxation Training, Behaviour Modification and Stress Management, I started writing children’s books. My primary purpose of writing for children was to convey to them through my books, the basic principles of ‘Anger Management.’The expression of ‘Anger’ by a child is a natural and healthy process that ought not to be discouraged by adults. When a child expresses anger, the adult is alerted to the fact that something is wrong, but the repression (non-expression) of anger by a child conceals personal hurt and a degree of emotional disturbance, which could lead to them feeling ‘unloved.’The most popular of all my children’s books have been the four stories of ‘Douglas the Dragon.’ These stories have been publicly read in thousands of Yorkshire Schools between 1990 and 2005.Numerous teachers have used them to help children come to terms with the emotional upset that moving house, changing schools, being separated from part of one’s family, bereavement of loved ones or being excluded from community activities can produce. Child Psychologists, Educational Welfare Officers and Trauma Therapists also used the stories to help abused children express their righteous anger, thereby enabling the progression of their emotional development through the facilitation of healthy expression.The central themes of the ‘Douglas the Dragon’ stories evolve around the issues of Anger, Fear, Love, Separation, Bereavement, Second Chances, the Effect of Exclusion and the unwelcome experience that Sudden Change can often produce. Indeed, the late Princess Diana once phoned me when Princes William and Harry were aged around 9 years and 7 years, and asked that I send her a copy of ‘Douglas the Dragon’ along with a copy of ‘Sleezy the Fox’ so that she may read them to her children at bedtime. There is a two-headed dragon that lives in the heart of every man, woman and child; a ‘Dragon of Anger’ and a ‘Dragon of Love.’ Both dragons compete for the control of our thoughts, feelings and actions, but only one of them can be victorious. The ‘Dragon of Anger’ will destroy you unless you evict it from your body in the form of healthy expression. We cannot get the ‘Dragon of Anger’ out of our bodies until we allow in the ‘Dragon of Love.’The ability to express the ‘Dragon of Love’ through our thoughts, words and deeds will lead us on to increased self-acceptance, greater happiness, improved health and personal freedom; bringing us closer to our true selves, our families, our friends, our neighbours and our God.
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Everyone and Everything

Everyone and Everything

William Forde

Psychology / Music

This book contains ten short stories written by William Forde, the founder of Anger Management and a leading Relaxation Trainer in Great Britain for over 50 years. It has been written for the 5-9 year-old reader and provides an ideal 10-minute reading slot fill for children during morning assemblies at school and before going to sleep at night. The stories deal with child problem issues of today.In areas of educational, social and moral development, the power of ‘story-telling’ remains unsurpassed. It is an important avenue of effective communication and learning between parent and child; teacher and pupil. ‘Everyone and Everything’ are short punchy stories that maintain the interest of the 5-9 year-old child.‘Story-telling’ stimulates the imaginative and creative processes of the mind and body and makes more things possible than would otherwise be achieved without it. To storytell about issues concerning behaviour that creates everyday problems for the child reader and which can relate to emotions that the child finds difficult to healthily express is a sure-fire way of grabbing their attention time span.The ten stories in ‘Everyone and Everything’ were written for the 5-9-year-old reader in 1990. While they helped to raise a lot of money through their sales for ‘Children in Need’ during November, 1990, their true value is that they can greatly assist in the improvement of aggressive and tense behaviours by children today.I wanted all of the stories I wrote in ‘Everyone and Everything’ to embrace and include the basic principles of Relaxation Training methods and Anger Management aspects of behaviour. As the original founder of ‘Anger Management’ courses in Great Britain during the early 70s and a leading exponent and instructor of Relaxation Training since the age of 22 years, I felt suitably equipped to write about those aspects of behaviour.‘Everyone and Everything’ was my very first published children’s book and proved so popular with children, class-room teachers and school heads that approximately 4,000 copies were sold within the Kirklees Community during November, 1990 alone.‘Everyone and Everything’ went on to prove so popular with heads of schools in subsequent years, not only because of the issues the stories raised, but because of their length and language used. They were easy to read and be read to, and for busy head teachers, the stories could be used ideally within a ten-minute morning-assembly slot. I offer this book freely as an e-book and would advise the school teachers and head teachers of our Primary School Children to consider the merits of reintroducing some of the stories therein to their future school assemblies. I would also ask any downloader of this book who enjoys its content, to promote its readership base and to make a small donation to the Children in Need Appeal next November.William Forde 22nd May, 2012
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Sleezy the Fox Play

Sleezy the Fox Play

William Forde

Psychology / Music

A play about ‘second chances’ based upon the four 'Sleezy the Fox’ stories that the late Princess Diana used to read to her children, William and Harry when they were aged 9 and 7 years respectively. Written by the founder of ‘Anger Management’ courses in Great Britain in the 70s, the stories were originally written for the purposes of radio transmission and are highly popular with schools.This play has been adapted from the four ‘Sleezy the Fox’ stories, which were recorded in the early 1990s for the original purpose of radio transmission.The prominent theme of the story is one of ‘second chances’, something that all of us require from time to time in our lives.In my earlier years of development, I needed ‘second chances’ on many occasions and was lucky enough to have received ‘second chances’ at crucial periods of my life. ‘Second chances’ not only redeemed my character, but it also reformed my behaviour from that of thief to one of honest citizen.In later life, as a Probation Officer and the founder of ‘Anger Management’ courses in Great Britain in the early 70s, I was able to afford the opportunity of receiving a ‘second chance’ to many people who displayed aggressive impulses that they were initially unable to control and manage.When Princes William and Harry were 9 and 7 years old respectively, their mother came across these stories, contacted me and requested that I send her a copy of my 'Douglas the Dragon' and 'Sleezy the Fox' stories that she wanted to read to her sons at their bedtime. It is a nice thought to know that the next King of England was read the stories of ‘Sleezy the Fox’ as a child by his mother, the late Princess Diana.The play has been written in a manner that makes it ideally suitable to be performed by schools and is arranged in such a way as to make the inclusion of a number of selected and suitable songs at appropriately spaced junctures possible to turn it into a Musical Play.
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